Hope your summer is off to a terrific start.

Summer is a great time to catch up on your reading. Here are 50 books that a colleague, Lindsey Anderson, recently shared on her blog that are sure to keep you inspired and your business thriving even during your summer adventures. If you don’t own a business yourself, feel free to share it with someone you know who does.

I feel honored to have my book Energize Your Business included on Lindsey’s list of must read business books. Enjoy!

50 Books for Small Businesses

By Lindsey Anderson

(The following is from Lindsey Anderson’s One-Click Lindsey blog post dated May 30, 2019)

In the wide world of business, so much emphasis is put on what’s “Bigger.” It’s good to have a large, successful business, of course, but no business becomes the company of your dreams overnight. Everyone starts somewhere. Maybe you’re in the early stages of building your business—you’ve worked hard, stayed dedicated, and you know there’s a vibrant market out there just waiting for your great idea! However, you may not be sure where to go from here; hard work and passion got you this far and will carry you even further, but maybe you’re looking for something a little extra, some help to push you in the direction you need to go.

Look no further! Countless entrepreneurs just like you have been in your shoes before, and many of them are willing to help. Here are 50 books to aid you in your small business ventures—whether you’re looking to expand your horizons or keep it small-time, these experts know the ins and outs of success in businesses of all sizes and are more than willing to share their wisdom in the hopes that others may follow their dreams…

(Read About the 50 Books)

Enjoy your summer adventures and staying inspired.

Much success and fulfillment,

Ray

Introduction

Are you looking to grow and expand your business and life? There’s and art and science to it. The art is choosing to create an intention (or goal) you love that is meaningful to you and others. The science is invoking the universal creation process to realize your inspired idea.

Invoking the 4-Phase Creation Process

Each of us has been born with the same power to create the reality we desire. In each moment, we get to choose to be a creator or a reactor in life. A creative life is a joyful, expansive life. A reactive life is a stressful, contractive life. As human beings, we feel most alive and energized when we are consciously creating something new.

If you are satisfied with what is showing up in your life, do more of that. If you don’t like what’s showing up, do something different to create a more satisfying experience. The four phases of creation to manifest any inspired idea or intention are:

  1. Imagine
  2. Visualize
  3. Expect
  4. Allow

Here’s what each of the phases entail. Read more

What do you do if someone you know or work with has a bad attitude or poor habit of doing something? A leader’s and parent’s job often includes mastering human relations by changing people’s attitudes and behavior.

In the last article I shared the “12 Ways to Win People to Your Way of Thinking ” from Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People.*

In this article, I share the remaining nine Dale Carnegie principles that can help you to be a leader who changes people without giving offense or arousing resentment.

Whether in business or your personal life, these following principles really work wonders to improve potentially destructive attitudes and behaviors.

9 Ways to Be a Leader:

How to Change People Without Giving Offense or Arousing Resentment

(Click on each principle to read a brief synopsis)

  1. Begin with praise and honest appreciation.
  2. Call attention to people’s mistakes indirectly.
  3. Talk about your own mistakes before criticizing the other person.
  4. Ask questions instead of giving direct orders.
  5. Let the other person save face.
  6. Praise the slightest improvement and praise every improvement. Be “hearty in your approbation and lavish in your praise.”
  7. Give the other person a fine reputation to live up to.
  8. Use encouragement. Make the fault seem easy to correct.
  9. Make the other person happy about doing the thing you suggest.

Enjoy mastering the art and science of human relations. Read more

Navigating today’s social and political climate which appears to be raging with divergent points of view takes mastery in human relations. Below are twelve common sense principles that can help.

In the last article I shared the “9 Ways to Be a Friendlier Person” from Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People.*

In this article I share the next twelve principles that can help you win people to your way of thinking (and still be friends). Whether in business or your personal life, these principles really work wonders to create alignment and mutual agreement.

12 Ways to Win People to Your Way of Thinking

(Click on each principle to read a brief synopsis)

  1. The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it.
  2. Show respect for the other person’s opinions. Never say, “You’re wrong.”
  3. If your are wrong, admit it quickly and emphatically.
  4. Begin in a friendly way.
  5. Get the other person saying “yes, yes” immediately.
  6. Let the other person do a great deal of the talking.
  7. Let the other person feel that the idea is his or hers.
  8. Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view.
  9. Be sympathetic with the other person’s ideas and desires.
  10. Appeal to the nobler motives.
  11. Dramatize your ideas.
  12. Throw down a challenge.

Enjoy mastering the art and science of human relations. Read more

Master the art and science of human relations. Do you want to be successful in business and life? Then it takes mastery in dealing with people.

This is an important time in history to show extreme kindness and compassion toward each other. To connect deeply.

Seeing so many people in attack mode these days can be disheartening. Maybe it’s time we remember the basics of human relations much like baseball players will return to the fundamentals of their swing when in a slump.

This summer I have enjoyed a great summer read that is as meaningful and relevant today as when it was published over 80 years ago—How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie.* I hope you have enjoyed the 30 principles I have shared over the past several months.

I thought you would enjoy an encapsulation of the principles. Whether in business or your personal life, these first nine principles will help you generate a magnetic, attractive personality.

3 Fundamental Techniques in Handling People

(Click on each principle to read a brief synopsis)

  1. Don’t criticize, condemn or complain
  2. Give honest and sincere appreciation
  3. Arouse in the other person an eager want

6 Ways to Make People Like You

(Click on each principle to read a brief synopsis)

  1. Become genuinely interested in other people.
  2. Smile.
  3. Remember that a person’s name is to him or her the sweetest and most important sound in any language.
  4. Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves.
  5. Talk in terms of the other person’s interests.
  6. Make the other person feel important—and do it sincerely.

Enjoy mastering the art and science of human relations. Read more

Human Relations Principle #29: Use encouragement. Make the fault seem easy to correct.

 

 

(This is the twenty-ninth in a series of articles where I will encapsulate each of Dale Carnegie’s timeless, life-changing principles for dealing with people. (Adapted from How to Win Friends and Influence People.))*

Tell your child, your spouse, or your employee that he or she is stupid or dumb at a certain thing, has no gift for it, and is doing it all wrong, and you have destroyed almost every incentive to try to improve. But use the opposite technique…

  • be liberal with your encouragement,
  • make the thing seem easy to do,
  • let the other person know that you have faith in his or her ability to do it, that he or she has an undeveloped flair for it,

and he or she will practice until the dawn comes in the window in order to excel. Read more

“Assume a virtue, if you have it not.”

~Shakespeare

 

 

 

Human Relations Principle #28: Give the other person a fine reputation to live up to.”

(“Give a dog a good name.”)

(This is the twenty-eighth in a series of articles where I will encapsulate each of Dale Carnegie’s timeless, life-changing principles for dealing with people. (Adapted from How to Win Friends and Influence People.))*

If you want to improve a person in a certain respect, act as though that particular trait were already one of his or her outstanding characteristics.

It might be well to assume and state openly that other people have the virtue you want them to develop. Give them a fine reputation to live up to, and they will make prodigious efforts rather than see you disillusioned.

There’s an old saying: “Give a dog a bad name and you may as well hang him.” But give him a good name—and see what happens.

What to do when a good worker begins to turn in shoddy work . . .

Read more

“Abilities wither under criticism;

they blossom under encouragement.”

~Dale Carnegie

 

 

Human Relations Principle #27: Praise the slightest improvement and praise every improvement. Be “hearty in your approbation and lavish in your praise.”

(“How to spur people on to success.”)

(This is the twenty-seventh in a series of articles where I will encapsulate each of Dale Carnegie’s timeless, life-changing principles for dealing with people. (Adapted from How to Win Friends and Influence People.))*

We all crave appreciation and recognition, and will do almost anything to get it. But nobody wants insincerity. Nobody wants flattery. When praise is specific, it comes across as sincere—not something the other person may be saying just to make one feel good.

If you and I will inspire the people with whom we come in contact to a realization of the hidden treasures they possess, we can do far more than change people. We can literally transform them.

What psychologists have discovered about praise, criticism, and human potential . . .

Read more

“I have no right to say or do anything that diminishes a man in his own eyes. What matters is not what I think of him, but what he thinks of himself. Hurting a man in his dignity is a crime.”

~Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Human Relations Principle #26: Let the other person save face.

(This is the twenty-sixth in a series of articles where I will encapsulate each of Dale Carnegie’s timeless, life-changing principles for dealing with people. (Adapted from How to Win Friends and Influence People.))*

Letting one save face! How important, how vitally important that is! And how few of us ever stop to think of it!

We ride roughshod over the feelings of others, getting in our own way, finding fault, issuing threats, criticizing a child or an employee in front of others, without even considering the hurt to the other person’s pride. Whereas a few minutes’ thought, a considerate word or two, a genuine understanding of the other person’s attitude, would go so far toward alleviating the sting!

Even if we are right and the other person is definitely wrong, we only destroy ego by causing someone to lose face.

How the General Electric Company dealt with a valuable employee . . .

Read more

Human Relations Principle #25: Ask questions instead of giving direct orders.

(“No one likes to take orders.”)

 

(This is the twenty-fifth in a series of articles where I will encapsulate each of Dale Carnegie’s timeless, life-changing principles for dealing with people. (Adapted from How to Win Friends and Influence People.))*

To be an effective leader, ask questions instead of giving direct orders.

When we ask questions, instead of giving orders, we give people the opportunity to do things themselves instead of taking away their accountability by telling them to do things; let them do them, let them learn from their mistakes. Give suggestions, not orders by asking questions like: Read more